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Auto Oxygen Sensor 234-4209 use on Four-wire universal car
 
   
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Auto Oxygen Sensor 234-4209 use on Four-wire universal car

Auto Oxygen Sensor 234-4209 oxygen sensor (or lambda sensor) is an electronic device that measures the proportion of oxygen (O2) in the gas or liquid being analyzed.Automotive oxygen sensors, colloquially known as O2 sensors, make modern electronic fuel i

  • Itemcode: HKAOS234
  • Weight.: 0.3 (Kg)
  • Item number: HKAOS234
  • Brand: Shumatt
  • Unit: pc
  • List Price: $40.00
  • Our Price: $21.00
  • Save: $19.00
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Auto Oxygen Sensor 234-4209 use on Four-wire universal car

Auto Oxygen Sensor 234-4209 oxygen sensor (or lambda sensor) is an electronic device that measures the proportion of oxygen (O2) in the gas or liquid being analyzed.

Automotive oxygen sensors, colloquially known as O2 sensors, make modern electronic fuel injection and emission control possible. They help determine, in real time, if the air–fuel ratio of a combustion engine is rich or lean. Since oxygen sensors are located in the exhaust stream, they do not directly measure the air or the fuel entering the engine but when information from oxygen sensors is coupled with information from other sources, it can be used to indirectly determine the air-fuel ratio. Closed loop feedback-controlled fuel injection varies the fuel injector output according to real-time sensor data rather than operating with a predetermined (open-loop) fuel map. In addition to enabling electronic fuel injection to work efficiently, this emissions control technique can reduce the amounts of both unburnt fuel and oxides of nitrogen entering the atmosphere. Unburnt fuel is pollution in the form of air-borne hydrocarbons, while oxides of nitrogen (NOx gases) are a result of combustion chamber temperatures exceeding 1,300 kelvin due to excess air in the fuel mixture and contribute to smog and acid rain.

Parameter of Auto Oxygen Sensor 234-4209

 

Part Number

HKAOS234-4209

Drawing No.

234-4209

Brand Figure

Shumatt

Applicable models

Four-wire universal car

Sensor length(cm)

8.5

Type

Four-wire

Line Length(cm)

49.5

Total length(cm)

58

 

Function of a lambda probe

Lambda probes are used to reduce vehicle emissions by ensuring that engines burn their fuel efficiently and cleanly.By measuring the proportion of oxygen in the remaining exhaust gas, and by knowing the volume and temperature of the air entering the cylinders amongst other things, an ECU can use look-up tables to determine the amount of fuel required to burn at the stoichiometric ratio (14.7:1 air:fuel by mass for gasoline) to ensure complete combustion.

Location of the probe in a system

The probe is typically screwed into a threaded hole in the exhaust system, located after the branch manifold of the exhaust system combines, and before the catalytic converter. New vehicles are required to have a sensor before and after the exhaust catalyst to meet U.S. regulations requiring that all emissions components be monitored for failure. Pre and post-catalyst signals are monitored to determine catalyst efficiency. Additionally, some catalyst systems require brief cycles of lean (oxygen-containing) gas to load the catalyst and promote additional oxidation reduction of undesirable exhaust components.

Sensor failures

Normally, the lifetime of an unheated sensor is about 30,000 to 50,000 miles (50,000 to 80,000 km). Heated sensor lifetime is typically 100,000 miles (160,000 km). Failure of an unheated sensor is usually caused by the buildup of soot on the ceramic element, which lengthens its response time and may cause total loss of ability to sense oxygen. For heated sensors, normal deposits are burned off during operation and failure occurs due to catalyst depletion. The probe then tends to report lean mixture, the ECU enriches the mixture, the exhaust gets rich with carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons, and the fuel economy worsens.

Leaded gasoline contaminates the oxygen sensors and catalytic converters. Most oxygen sensors are rated for some service life in the presence of leaded gasoline but sensor life will be shortened to as little as 15,000 miles depending on the lead concentration. Lead-damaged sensors typically have their tips discolored light rusty.

Another common cause of premature failure of lambda probes is contamination of fuel with silicones (used in some sealings and greases) or silicates (used as corrosion inhibitors in some antifreezes). In this case, the deposits on the sensor are colored between shiny white and grainy light gray.

Leaks of oil into the engine may cover the probe tip with an oily black deposit, with associated loss of response.

An overly rich mixture causes buildup of black powdery deposit on the probe. This may be caused by failure of the probe itself, or by a problem elsewhere in the fuel rationing system.

Applying an external voltage to the zirconia sensors, e.g. by checking them with some types of ohmmeter, may damage them.

Some sensors have an air inlet to the sensor in the lead, so contamination from the lead caused by water or oil leaks can be sucked into the sensor and cause failure.

Symptoms of a failing oxygen sensor includes:

Sensor Light on dash indicates problem

Increased tailpipe emissions

Increased fuel consumption

Hesitation on acceleration

Stalling

Rough idling

Pictures of Auto Oxygen Sensor

Auto Oxygen Sensor 234-4209 Picture 1

Auto Oxygen Sensor 234-4209 Picture 2

Auto Oxygen Sensor 234-4209 Picture 3

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